The Red Door Clinic :: Minnesota's Largest HIV/STD Testing Center


Red Door Services of the
Hennepin County Public Health Clinic

Heath Services Building
525 Portland Ave
4th Floor
Minneapolis, MN 55415

612.543.5555 (main)
612.348.4729 (TTY)
612.596.7900 (fax)

Click here for directions!

Contact us


General Clinic Hours

Monday & Wednesday 8:00am - 7:00pm
Tuesday, Thursday & Friday 8:00am - 4:00pm

Due to a staff meeting, the clinic begins seeing STD clients at 9:00 am on the 2nd and 4th Tuesday of each month instead of normal business hours.

Arriving earlier will help reduce wait times and increase the chance of being seen for walk-in services.


InSPOT :: An easy way to tell your partners you have an STD

Click here to view our new brochure (pdf)

STD Facts :: Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)

WHAT IS IT?

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a very common vaginal condition. It is probably more common than yeast infections in women.  Many different types of bacteria (germs) that are normally found in a healthy vagina can cause it.

WHY DO WE NEED TO KNOW ABOUT IT?

BV is the most common vaginal infection in women of childbearing age. In the United States, BV is common in pregnant women (with the CDC estimating 1,080,000 pregnant women with BV each year). The bacteria that cause BV can sometimes infect the uterus (womb) and fallopian tubes, resulting in pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). PID can cause infertility or damage enough to increase the future risk of ectopic pregnancy (meaning the baby grows outside the womb) and infertility

Having bacterial vaginosis makes it easier to both get HIV (because of tissue inflammation) and give HIV (there is more HIV in vaginal fluids when a person is infected) and can cause pregnancy complications, including premature bith and low birth weight.

HOW DO I GET IT?

Bacterial vaginosis can begin when there are too many of one or more types of bacteria normally found in the vagina.  Usually an overgrowth of the bacteria happens when something upsets the normal chemical balance of the vagina and the germs multiply to a number greater than what is needed to keep the vagina healthy.  Things that may contribute to causing BV include the following:

Other things that change the normal vaginal secretions and may cause BV include:

Bacterial vaginosis is not caused by a sex partner transmitting a germ to you.  It is not considered to be a sexually transmitted disease (STD).

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

Many women experience no symptoms.  For those that do get symptoms, the most common symptoms include:

HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAVE IT?

BV can be diagnosed on the day of your visit to the clinic. This is done by examining some vaginal discharge under the microscope.

HOW IS IT TREATED?

The usual treatment is with a medicine called metronidazole (Flagyl).  As with any medicine, it is important to take all the medicine that is given to you.  If you can't take Flagyl for some  reason, there are other antibiotics that can be used to treat BV.  Avoid intercourse while being treated for BV.

BV can recur after treatment. Sometimes, women can get BV for no apparent reason.  If you have repeated episodes of BV, it is best to consult an OB-GYN specialist.

For more specific information about treatment, consult your medical provider. You can also read more in the CDC's 2006 Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines.

WHAT ABOUT SEX PARTNERS?

It is best to wait two weeks after treatment, but at the very least wait at least one week after treatment before having sex.

Since BV is commonly shared between female partners, it is recommended that female partners be tested and treated for BV as well before having sex again. Male sex partners do not need to be treated before having sex again.

WAYS TO REDUCE YOUR RISK

For more information about gonorrhea, check out the CDC's Bacterial Vaginosis Fact Sheet.

Questions about your risk? About testing? Email us or call 612.543.555.

Click here to print this pageClick here to print this page